ALEXANDRIA LAKES AREA
Fishing Reports

Fishing Reports provided by Lindy Pro Guide Joe Scegura.

August 5, 2015 Fishing Report

Late Summer Fishing Report and Tactics

The walleye fishing in the Alexandria area continues to be some of the best I've seen in years. Other than the occasional cold front which slows the bite for a day or two, the fishing has been very consistent.

We've been able to catch a decent number of walleye nearly every time we hit the water.

The majority of the fish I've been catching have been in 17-22 feet of water near the outside weed edge. This time of year just about every technique you can think of will work at some point. The trick to consistently catching walleye is in deciding when to use each technique.

For example, I prefer to use fast presentations like spinners and crank baits when I'm looking for fish or the fish are spread out over a particular area. I like to tip the spinners with a leech or night crawler. You can fish these techniques easily in areas with short weeds or scattered weed clumps. I will trolls these baits picking up a walleye here or there all day long.

That is unless I see a concentrated school of fish. This is where I pull out my "slow tactics". I prefer to use Lindy rigs and slip bobber rigs with leeches or night crawlers in these situations. The slower presentations allow me to spend more time sitting directly over the fish instead of going over them fast and then turning around to do it again. If the school of fish I was seeing split apart I will quickly go back to my fast presentations and look for the next big school!

This program will work like clockwork the next few weeks at least.

Then, as the walleye bite dies down I'll switch my efforts over to catching huge smallmouth.  In September the smallmouth go on a fall feeding binge that no angler will want to miss. I'll discuss the smallmouth bite more in my next report. Good luck and feel free to email me with questions.

 

July 13, 2015 Fishing Report

The fishing over the Holiday weekend was excellent!  The weather was great and the fish were hungry.  The past couple weeks has been some of the best fishing of the year for me.  I’ve heard reports of all species being very aggressive.  Even on my evening trips it’s common to get numerous species.

The majority of the walleye have moved to the outside weed edges in 18-22’.  If you have good electronics I would drive until you read fish.  I might drive around at 3-5mph for two hours before I ever drop a line on a new body of water.  Or I’ll pull around #5-#7 crank baits while I’m looking for fish on my locator.  If I see 4-5 nice marks on my locator I’ll stop and fish that area with Lindy rigs tipped with leeches or night crawlers.

If you don’t have much for electronics I’d concentrate my efforts on the outside weed edge of points and sand bar breaks.  If you don’t catch anything after a pass or two keep moving.  Pull Lindy rigs at .1-.5mph, spinners at .9-1.2mph, or crank baits at 2-2.5mph.  I could go on for hours but each one of these presentations has their time and place based off what my locator tells me.

Right at sunset and sunrise will be your prime fishing times.  Good luck and check back soon for more info!

 

June 22, 2015 Fishing Report

Summer is officially here, and that means we will get more daylight than any other time of the year to enjoy the things we love. The long days also mean warmer water temps and that makes nearly every activity more enjoyable, including fishing of course!  With water temps near 70 degrees, many lakes are putting out a good variety of fish right now.      

I’ve been catching the majority of my walleye in 10’-16’ fow.  Lindy rigs tipped with either leeches or night crawlers have been working best. I’m still moving quite slow at .1-.5mph.  The walleye are holding in and near the new weed growth.  I will pull Lindy rigs where I can and I use slip bobbers in areas that are too weedy or rocky.  These techniques will be my prime focus until we see a drastic summer warm up.

As we head into July and the water temps spike more and more walleye will move deeper.  It will be common to fish the outside weed edge in 16’-24’ fow with a faster presentation like a spinner or crank bait.  I like to pull these baits at 1-3mph to cover as much water as possible.  During the summer months there is an abundance of food, so just because you find walleye doesn’t mean they will be hungry.  That’s where moving fast will help you find the hungry fish as well as trigger some reaction bites where the fish just hit your bait out of instinct.     

I concentrate my time mostly on walleye so that’s what I generally write about, but I can’t forget to mention all of the great panfish opportunities that are coming up.  Over the next month I will catch more big sunfish and big crappie unintentionally while I’m fishing walleye than any other time of the year.  There are many times where I just put away the walleye rods and enjoy the day catching crappie over the weeds in 10 fow with a small twister tail jig or put on a small hair jig and fish the pencil reeds for big bluegill.  The options are endless and the panfish are flat out hungry, so it’s a great time to bring out the kids! 

Check back in a couple weeks right after July 4th and I will have a bunch more awesome pictures to share with you! 
Good luck fishing and feel free to drop me a line with any questions.  

May 22, 2015 Fishing Report

The walleye opener was slower overall than I expected, but still a success in my opinion.  Our group fished hard opening morning and was able to catch a number of quality walleye.  Even though the bite was slower than normal we still managed plenty of fish by noon for our annual opening day fish fry.  With full bellies we hit the water again Saturday evening and experienced a slightly better bite.  There were even a few reports of anglers limiting out on walleye around the area.

 It’s been almost two weeks since opener and up until recently we've had some very difficult weather.  The high and low pressure systems moving through every other day have made fishing a bit unpredictable.  The past few days on the other hand have really improved the bite.  The more consistent days in a row we can get the better.  The beginning part of this weekend looks to be quite nice so I expect the quality bite to continue.

The walleye are holding in 3-20 fow.  They will move in shallow to feed in the low light time periods.  Then, during the day you can follow them back out to deeper water.  My preferred bait is still minnows and will be until we get into June.  All of the fish we have been catching are spitting up numerous minnows, so it’s easy to see what they want.  I’ve been using jigs and lindy rigs tipped with minnows.

My highlight for the week was taking my 20 month old son walleye fishing for the first time.  The weather was poor, but he was not about to be left at home with Mom so along he went.  I figured with the wind and drizzle this was going to be a short trip, but he was not deterred by the weather.  Not only was he not deterred, he was very interested in catching “woweye”.  He held his rod and was able to reel in a number of small walleye.  To say I was impressed with my little man’s drive for fishing would be an understatement.  There are few things in this life more memorable to a father than watching his child battle a fish as strong as they are!

It looks like the holiday weekend is forecasting some steadier weather, so let’s keep our fingers crossed for nice weather and tight lines! 

 

May 8, 2015 Fishing Report

Happy fishing opener eve everyone!  The weather for Saturday looks as promising as the walleye fishing.  The water on many of the shallower lakes has warmed to nearly 60 degrees, so I predict the walleye will be quite aggressive.  In years past when the water was this warm on opener the walleye have bit very well on many different lakes.  The crappie and sunfish have also been biting well, so there are a lot of options for fishing this weekend.   

Even though the water is warm, the walleye will still be shallow and minnow style baits will be the top producers.  Saturday morning I will be using a 1/4oz jig tipped with a minnow or a plain Lindy rig with a minnow.  Concentrate your efforts on shallow sand, rock or gravel areas in 7-15 fow.  This is where the majority of the fish will be caught Saturday. 

(Tip: Always choose the windy side of the lake.  The water clarity will be lower in these areas and the bait will be more disoriented.  Fish are very opportunistic, so that’s why fishing in the wind will put more walleye in your boat!)

If you plan to fish after dark I’d use a crank bait near moving water.  Walleye will move into these areas under the cover of darkness to feed on the spawning minnows.  A shallow crank bait will imitate these minnows perfectly and will allow you to cover a lot of water.  This is a great time to catch a trophy fish.  Almost every one of my trophy fish caught in the spring was caught in the middle of the night casting a crank bait.  So, if you have the drive to catch a big fish set the alarm clock for midnight and get out there early!   

Many out of state anglers ask me, “Why is the MN opener such a big deal to Minnesotans?”  My answer is always the same, “Tradition!”  It’s a time for family and friends to enjoy the outdoors together, as well as catch some tasty walleye.  Bringing in the new walleye season with family is a tradition I’ve enjoyed for over 25 years and I don’t plan to miss one anytime soon!  Good luck everyone! 

Note: Walleye pictures are from previous years, but check back soon for walleye pictures from 2015!

 

April 16, 2015 Fishing Report

The ice went out much quicker this year than average.  Mild temps coupled with high winds melted ice in days that should have taken weeks.  This early start to spring is a nice change from the past couple of years when the ice didn’t decide to leave until May! 

This early ice out will allow local anglers to take advantage of the excellent crappie bite that happens every spring.  The past couple years the crappies were just starting to bite when walleye fishing opened in early May.  The walleye is Minnesota’s most popular fish, so it usually overshadows the crappie bite no matter how good it is.  This year anglers will have a few weeks to chase crappie before they have to clutter their minds with visions of trophy walleye.

With the last of the ice getting blown off the lakes this past weekend, the shallow bays are starting to warm nicely.  The bays located on the north side of the lakes will warm the quickest.  The ideal bay is 1-3 feet deep with a mucky black bottom.  The crappie will flock to these areas in search of food.  I recommend using a small 1/32oz-1/64oz jig, like Lindy Little Nipper tipped with a crappie minnow.  Set the jig about 18-24” under a float and this is all you need to catch some nice crappie in the spring. 

There are already reports of a half dozen or more lakes putting out eater sized crappie, so this weekend would be a great time to get the boat wet and do some fishing or just grab a pole and fish from shore.  You can hop from lake to lake on sunny afternoon until you find the hot bite.  There are few things more enjoyable than relaxing with the family on the lake!

 

April 1, 2015 Fishing Report

Ah, spring… it’s a favorite season to many people for many different reasons.  There are changes happening literally everywhere you look.  The snow and the ice are melting, grass is beginning to green, and birds of all types are migrating.  In fact, fish migrate just like other animals do.  Only instead of traveling hundreds or thousands of miles, fish travel from deep water to shallow water. 

So why do fish migrate?  Let me start off by saying each species has the same end goal, and that’s to fatten up prior to their spawning season.  As the water from the melting snow and ice pours into the lakes it brings with it oxygen.  The newly forming green vegetation also releases oxygen into the water, bringing the underwater world alive.  There’s no place these spring changes are more apparent than in shallow water.  Bait fish move in to eat the bugs and the larger fish move in to feed on the bait fish and so on right up the food chain.

Only a few short weeks ago these shallow 4-8 feet areas were almost void of life, but now with the spring effects taking hold these areas are teaming with life.  Depending on the water clarity it’s very common to be able to sight bluegill and crappie just under the ice.  Last week when I was out the fish were nearly touching their dorsal fins on the bottom of the ice as they swam around in search of food.  I would simply lower #12 Lindy Toad a few inches under the ice and the fish would instantly show up to eat.  In my opinion this is one of the best times to get kids hooked on fishing.  This time of year offers an angler a rare look into the underwater world below the ice.  Watching a big bluegill or crappie swim inches under your feet to eat your offering is something that will stick in your mind for some time! 

As of today the ice has pulled away from shore on a number of lakes.  You should still be able to get on the ice through the weekend, but your time to experience this shallow water ice bite is limited.  We have about twenty four inches of rather soft ice left in the Alexandria area, so I predict anglers will only have a week left of ice fishing.  The hot weather and wind is making fast work of the ice.  If you do plan to head out make sure you wear a life jacket at this time of year.  On the bright side, once the ice is too poor to fish, there will be dozens of other areas ready to fish from shore.  That’s one of the great things about the Alexandria area.  We have a wide variety of lakes so there is always somewhere to catch fish 365 days a year.  These big panfish won’t spawn until the water temps reach into the mid 60’s, so there are numerous opportunities coming up to get in on some excellent fishing of your own! 

Keep checking back for updates and I’ll tell you when to hook up the boat and head for Alexandria!

 

Trophy Bluegills of Alexandria, MN: March 5, 2015

I’m sure many of you are ready for winter to be over, but as we all know it won’t be for some time yet.  Like it or not, we potentially have well over a month of good ice fishing left.   So, instead of waiting for warm weather, get out and enjoy some of the best ice fishing of the year.

As of last weekend, walleye fishing closed in Minnesota, but there are still plenty of other fish to chase.  Especially in the Alexandria area where there are dozens of excellent panfish lakes.  Every one of these lakes is unique and has its own characteristics… big, small, deep, shallow, clean or stained water.  All of these are pieces to a puzzle that the avid ice angle loves to put together. 

Just last week I was fishing a smaller lake and found some trophy sized panfish.  We were able to catch numerous bluegill pushing over a pound.  Hitting these small lakes requires quite a bit more effort, but the payoff can be huge!  This particular day I drilled between 75 and 100 holes before I caught a couple medium sized bluegill.  After I located these fish I continued to drill circles around this area until I was able to locate the majority of the fish in the area. 

When I’m hopping from hole to hole in search of fish I like to use a tungsten jig.  They fall much faster than lead jigs and allow me to cover more water.  If I fish a hole for a couple minutes without seeing a nice fish on the locator I reel up and move.  My favorite style jig is a horizontal jig like the Lindy Toad.  I hook one or two euro larva on the jig and I’m ready to go.  (Quick Tip: I recommend anglers to smash or pop their larva.  This will help let scent out of the bait and can help trigger bites from those big finicky bluegills.)

Check back soon for more reports!

 

January 26, 2015 Fishing Report

Anglers all across the Alexandria lakes area are enjoying this beautiful weather.  It’s been warm enough to fish outside during the day yet cold enough at night to still make ice.  We have 20”-28” of clear solid ice with only a couple inches of snow on top.   This has made traveling to and from the fishing areas a breeze this ice season. 

The walleye fishing remains decent on many lakes, with the hour at dusk and dawn producing most of the fish for the day.  During these “prime bite windows” I like to be set up on some good structure like a weed line, rock edge or underwater point.  These areas hold a lot of bait, so as the light decreases walleye will always be lurking near looking for an easy meal.

The sunfish and crappie bite has also been decent, but with each passing week I’m starting to see it get even better.  The shallow water bite is especially heating up.  I’ve heard numerous reports of aggressive panfish in 10’ or less.  This is my favorite way to fish for panfish because it’s a lot like hunting or also known as “ice trolling”.  Drilling a lot of holes and staying on the move is the key to getting these big daytime crappie and sunfish.  I like to use a Tungsten Lindy Toad tipped with euro larvae.  I like to fish each holes for a minute or two and move on. 

I hope these tips help you catch a few more fish this weekend.   Good luck and check back soon for more updates! 

January Fishing Report

It appears winter is back and the balmy weather has finally moved on.   It certainly feels like we are living in Minnesota again, and instead of melting ice we are back to making it.  At the peak of the warm weather we still had plenty of ice for fishing, but we did lose a few inches during the warm spells.  For the most part it didn’t effect fishing much.  Anglers were still able to get around on ATV’s and snowmobiles.    

The past few days of cold weather are repairing the lost ice quickly and I’m back to seeing 12”-18” of ice on most bodies of water.  I don’t want to sound like a broken record, but please make sure you check the ice before you decide to drive on it.  It sounds like common sense but you just never know how thick the ice is until you check it the entire way.  I was out a week ago and found 3 inches of ice in the middle of the lake only a half mile from a group of trucks.  If you’re unsure of the ice conditions just walk and check the ice as you go.  This is a great way to enjoy the sport of ice fishing and it’s incredibly safe.

The walleye action continues to be fairly steady.  I’m hearing decent reports on a number of lakes in 15-20 feet of water.  I try to look for structure near deep water.  By structure I mean any anything that’s different.  For example, walleye will hold to something as simple as a bottom changing from sand to gravel or something as pronounced as a big pile of rocks.  Finding these areas can be difficult in the winter, so when I’m ice fishing a new lake I usually fish the structure I can find and that’s depths change.  I like to pick out hooks or points off a map with a nice taper to deep water.  These areas are ideal for cruising walleye looking for an easy meal.

The sunfish and crappie action remains very strong.  The Alexandria area has an abundance of quality panfish lakes.  The shallow 15-20 feet flat bay-type areas have been producing best.  These areas are producing a large number of both crappie and sunfish.  The big sunfish get big for a reason, so make sure to use a small hook and light line.  My favorite sunfish setup is 2lb monofilament line and a #12 Lindy toad tipped with a Euro larva or two.  When it comes to panfish there’s not much this setup can’t catch. 

When fishing suspended crappie after dark you can get away with heavier line and bigger hooks.  My favorite low light crappie setup is 4lb monofilament line and a #8 Frostee tipped with a small crappie minnow.  This is an ideal setup for suspended crappie after dark.  

Good luck fishing and I hope your new year is filled with big fish!

 

 

December Fishing Report
Wow it’s hard to believe we were fishing out of a boat only two weeks ago and now we are standing on 6”- 10“ of ice.  The last couple weeks of open water were very good for fishing.  The water temps had finally gotten to the point where the walleye were biting very well and then the cold weather hit us.  It only took about 48 hours and we had ice! 

With the extreme cold weather the lakes have been making nearly an inch a night.  Of course ice thickness varies from lake to lake but most of the lakes have good fishable ice on them right now.  This past weekend there were quite a few anglers fishing both panfish and walleye. 

The walleye have been hitting best on jigging spoons tipped with a fathead in 10 to 18 feet of water.  Look for areas near deep water that have a rocky bottom and weeds.  These areas will have walleye activity in the low light time periods. 

Crappie and sunfish have also been quite active.  The best areas for me early season are usually flat bottom weedy bays that are 10 to 18 feet deep.  The fish will generally congregate near any standing green vegetation.  I like to keep on the move until I find a large number of fish.  Once I find them, I use a small #12 horizontal jig like Lindy Toad tipped with a small euro larva or wax worm.

This cold weather might not be your first choice for weather, but it’s not too often we get to fish on the ice before Thanksgiving.  So let’s all be thankful and enjoy some excellent Minnesota ice fishing!

 

November Fishing Report

This has been the mildest October I can remember.  Normally by this time of the year we have had numerous hard frosts and water temperatures would be in the low 40’s.  This year we’ve had some unbelievably warm weather that has kept the water temps in the low 50’s.

Although the warm weather has been enjoyable, it has made the walleye bite extremely unpredictable.  Earlier in the month we had some cool days that really got the walleye going.  Then the warm weather hit, which significantly slowed down the walleye bite.  The walleye we have been able to catch have been caught on a Lindy rig and a minnow or a jig and a minnow in 15’-40’ of water.

There is a positive to the warm weather though; it has prolonged the excellent bite for the smallmouth and crappie.  In fact, some of my best smallmouth and crappie action this year has happened in the past couple weeks.  We have had numerous days where anglers have literally complained about aching arms!  I have to say that kind of complaining is always music to a fishing guide’s ears.

It’s clear the smallmouth bite has been as good as it gets for weeks now, but up until this last weekend nearly all of the walleye I was cleaning had empty bellies.  With the signs of increased feeding, anglers will begin to notice a more aggressive walleye bite taking place over the next couple weeks.  Some of the best fishing of the all is yet to come so don’t put the boat away yet!

 

 

 

 

October Fishing Report

The fall fishing has been excellent the past few weeks.  We’ve been catching literally hundreds of very large smallmouth.  If you’re not familiar with smallmouth, there is no other freshwater fish that fights harder pound for pound.  They are also a beautiful fish that are extremely fun to catch.      

Smallmouth are most commonly found in shallow rocky areas (2-15 feet of water).  The will hit numerous minnow or minnow style presentations.  They feel the need to fatten up for winter, so that’s why September is such a great time to fish smallmouth.  They will be feeding aggressively like this into mid-October.

 

Once the smallmouth bite slows I move right over to a hot walleye bite.  The walleye bite usually hits its peak by mid to late October.  They will feed aggressively on minnow presentations well into November and into the ice fishing season.  My preferred technique is either a jig and a minnow or a Lindy rig and a minnow.

In my opinion there’s no better time to get out and enjoy the fall colors and experience some great fishing.  If you have any questions about the area don’t hesitate to contact me.  I’m happy to help!

 

 

 

September 2014 Report

The past couple weeks we’ve been getting some decent fish, but nothing like we will be catching over the next couple months.  This current cold front has slowed fishing for the time being, but will only help fishing in the long run.  When the water temperatures drop, all species feel the need to feed heavily.  Early last week we had water temps in the low 70’s, but less than a week later we are seeing surface temps in the low 60’s.  Once this weather system stabilizes it won’t take long to see the positive effects of this cooler weather.        


The fall is my favorite time of year to fish.  The lakes are less crowded and the scenery is second to none.  Not to mention the excellent fishing!  Almost all species will start to prefer larger minnow or minnow style baits.  Especially smallmouth, they are my favorite species to fish for in September.  These fish fight harder pound for pound than any other freshwater fish.  Over the next few weeks these fish will be eating nearly nonstop in 2’-10’ of water.  This will be quite apparent because their shape will resemble that of a football.


Walleye, on the other hand, wait a while longer.  They will be most aggressive in mid to late October.  This is one of the most productive times to fish for walleye, and is one of the best times to catch a true trophy!  A jig and a minnow fished on the outside weed edge in 16’-30’ of water will produce the most fish.  If you have any questions let me know.  Otherwise, grab the family and enjoy a trip to the Alexandria lakes area this fall!

 

 

 

August 2014 Report

The fishing in the Alexandria area has been very good the past few weeks.  Prior to this we’ve had excellent fishing, but it was inconsistent.  One day you would do very well on walleye and the next day a cold front would push through and make the walleye extremely difficult to catch.  The weather has been much more consistent lately and so has the walleye action.  We’ve been seeing good numbers of very nice eater sized walleye along with some big picture fish as well.

 

Generally, during this time of year the bite can be very tough, but with the help of fellow guide Ben Hittle (ph# 320-766-1832) we’ve been able to stay on some very nice walleye.  It’s been a combination of fishing faster and deeper.  A common depth for us has either been shallow 5’-6’ or 20’-28’ feet of water depending on the time of day.  Pulling lindy rigs, spinners and crank baits have all been producing at about 1.0-2.5mph.  Covering a lot of water has been the key to our success.  You need to locate the fish that are actively feeding on bait.  You should be able to see plenty of fish sitting tight to the bottom on your Lowrance, but the fish that are up 2-3’ feeding on clouds of bait are the fish we like to target.

 

Panfishing has also been very good.  Most of the good reports have come from 12-18’ weeds.  A 1/16 oz. jig and a white twister tail trolled at about 1mph has been a great way to locate the nice crappie.  I’ve also had very good success with a 1/32oz jig and a small spinner.  Trolling either one of these baits is a great way to locate hungry schools of fish.  I see too many people go out with just a bobber and a worm, hoping for the best.  If you know where the fish are this approach works very well, but if you are trying to locate the fish then, IMO, this technique is too slow.  More often than not people end up giving up before they find the fish.

 

Keeping on the move until you find hungry fish sounds like common sense, but by picking the right search baits, regardless of the species, you can greatly increase your odds of having a productive day on the water.  The fishing can’t get much better than it is right now, so if you’re interested in coming up and have questions, don’t hesitate to contact me. 

 

Summer Report 6/30/2014:

 

The past month has been a bit of a rollercoaster ride.  We started off with an excellent bite as usual for early June, boating many very good sized walleye.  With some very large walleye mixed in that were 25”-29”.  The fish were showing preference to leeches and crawlers pulled at a faster speed.  Fish were schooled up tightly on weed lines, rock humps and other various structures.  Everything appeared to be on track for some fantastic June fishing.

 

Then the stretch of rainy/stormy weather hit.  I think it was a combination of very warm temps, mayfly hatches and strong rain storms causing large amounts of runoff that mixed the fish up a bit.  The fish were still schooled tightly, but they would just downright refuse to bite at times.  No matter what presentation or bait you tried the fish would just look at it.

 

This was a bit frustrating because many anglers have come accustomed to the almost guaranteed good fishing June usually brings.  But, as usual with unsteady weather patterns, if you stick it out the bite will turn around.  It was a long 7-10 days but the hot fishing is back!  We are seeing great catches of all species this past week. Walleye, bluegills, crappie, bass, northern and even muskie have been very active.

 

The walleye have been active in a variety of depths, but 15-25 feet has been the preferred depth.  Lindy rigs or bobbers with leeches have been doing very well.  Tall standing cabbage weeds will hold a wide variety of fish.  Fishing in or around them can yield very good results this time of year.  This week I have caught northern, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, rock bass, sunfish and walleye all mixed together in the same weed areas.

 

Barring any major weather disturbances, we should see some excellent fishing for the holiday weekend and the following weeks.  So, bring the rods along and get those kids out fishing!

    

 

May 2014 Report:

The water temps are finally beginning to rise with this wonderful spring weather the past few days.  As always on opener, some anglers did very well and others just caught a few.  But, in general, it was a successful opener for most.  Water temperatures were in the mid 40’s on most of the lakes, and for the most part the fish had just finished spawning.  The majority of the fish that were caught were in very shallow water.  Six feet of water or less with a rocky or gravel bottom seemed to be the ticket.

The best reports came from people using casting methods, which is very common when fish are in that shallow.  Casting a jig and a minnow or long lining a Lindy rig has been working very well during the day.  During the evening a crank bait has been producing some very nice fish as well.

The fishing has been getting better by the day, and this week I’ve heard some excellent reports from many anglers.  The water has warmed into the low 50’s on many of the lakes and the minnows have absolutely flooded the shallows.  These minnows will continue to bring the fish in shallow to feed, but in general many fish are being caught in a bit deeper water.  I look for the same presentations mentioned above to produce this weekend in 5-12 feet of water. 

These same techniques will work as long as the minnows are up shallow.  Once the minnows disappear in early June we will begin to see a transition to other baits like Leeches and night crawlers.  For now stick shallow on rocks or gravel with a minnow presentation and move slow!

Check back for updates and/or contact me with any specific questions you might have.  Good luck fishing!

 

4/25/14 Fishing Report

It’s been less than two weeks since I was ice fishing last, and today we are ice free on most of the lakes across the Alexandria area.  The strong winds and rain the last couple days did a fine job of melting the remaining ice.  There are a few of the larger lakes that still have some ice on them, but with a week of rain and wind in the forecast I have no doubt by the middle of next week Alexandria will be 100% ice free.

There are already numerous reports of crappie being caught in good numbers right off of shore.  The next month will be prime time for our spring crappie bite.  My ideal crappie areas this time of year are black mucky bottom bays.  These areas warm up the quickest, which brings in large amounts of bait.  The bait will then draw in the panfish to feed on them.  A small jig like a Little Nipper with a crappie minnow set 1-3 feet under a float will do the trick in most cases.  Other tactics like plastics and small spoons will also work well at times.  Low light time periods are best, but on a calm sunny spring day the fish have been known to bite well all day long.  This is one of the few times out of the year where the shore fisherman can do just as well, if not better than, someone with a boat.  (Note: Crappie 10”-12” are great eating size and crappie 13” and up should be returned to the water to spawn and get even bigger!)

Walleye opener is also coming fast.  Last year the ice came off many of the lakes the evening before opener, so compared to that we are 2-3 weeks ahead of schedule.  The walleye will be in all of the usual spring locations and ready to bite come opener.  One of my favorite early season walleye areas is shallow water (1’-5’) with current.  During the low light time periods these areas are full of bait and the walleye come to these areas to feed.  Casting a crank bait like #5 Lindy Shadling or a comparable minnow imitation works very well.  As does a jig and a minnow casted and retrieved slowly.

During the day I like to fish a little deeper water (7’-15’) and preferably areas with rock and gravel.  A jig and a minnow or a Lindy rig and a minnow fished very slowly across the bottom will catch a lot of walleye.  The common theme here is using minnow or minnow imitations.  There are a few lakes in the area where other baits like leeches and night crawlers will do well, but in my opinion there is no better bait than a minnow in the spring!

The fishing in Alexandria is excellent year round, but May is one of the few times of the year where trophy quality fish can be taken just as easily from shore as they can be from a boat.  So take your family to Alexandria and catch some memories that will last a lifetime!

 

March 24th Alexandria Fishing Report

With a fresh six inches of snow last week and single digit temps this past weekend, winter just refuses to let go!  The ice has not deteriorated much at all, and if you have an extension for your auger I’d plan to bring it with.  It’s possible to get by without one, but it definitely makes drilling holes much more difficult.  With warm temperatures in the forecast for this coming weekend, I’d also recommend bringing ice cleats with you.  The little snow we have left on the lakes will go quickly, so it could get slick out on the ice.

Fish are still biting very well.  The past few weeks have only had a few “slow” days of fishing, and those directly coincided with the big drops in temperature.  With the big warm up in sight, it should help get those fish moving into their spring feeding habits. Generally by this time of year many of the panfish have moved into shallower water, but I’m still having very good luck in 15’-25’ of water on many of the larger lakes.  The smaller lakes with water flowing through them do warm up faster, so I'm starting to see fish right up under the ice in 5’-8’ of water.  During this spring transition period fish will be all over the board.   Some shallow, some deep, but as we get farther into spring all fish will be moving shallower.

I’ve been finding sunfish and crappie during the day in large numbers.  It’s definitely a moving game though.  If you don’t see fish on your locator you simply have to keep moving.  My best luck has still been with a small horizontal jig tipped with a Euro larva.  During the evening sunfish generally taper off and the crappie spread out in search of an easy meal.  Over the last few months I’ve had excellent luck in the deep basin areas.  A crappie minnow under a float has proven to be an excellent bait to catch these suspended fish.

Ice conditions are excellent and the fish are going to be biting better than ever, so don’t miss the chance to get in on some of the best angling of the year.  The ice conditions will change quickly over the next month so check my audio reports for updates.  If you have any questions just send me an email and I’ll get back to you quickly.  Good luck!

 

Feb 19th Fishing Report

As the snow piles continue to grow, another Winter month has come and gone.  The calendar tells us spring is on the way, but it's difficult to see any real signs that it's near.  With over 30" of ice on many of the lakes, this year is shaping up to be similar to last year.  We were ice fishing well into April and we still had ice on the lakes for our May walleye opener.  Depending on the person, all this cold and ice will get different reviews.  The average person may be counting the days until summer, but to the many avid ice anglers things couldn't be better!

The sunfish and crappie action remains hot.  I've been finding the majority of my fish near deep water on the breaks in 15-30 foot of water.  Depending on the lake "deep water" may be anywhere from 20-50 feet down.  Panfish like to concentrate near the edge of these deep basin areas making them fairly predictable.  I usually drill 20-30 holes to start with, along the edge of one of these breaks.  If I don't read a decent number of fish I just keep drilling until I do.

The other day I decided to try some small lakes I hadn't been on in a while in hopes of finding the next hot bite.  These small lakes can pay off huge at times.  You can literally be the only person on the lake catching fish hand over fist with some even reaching trophy caliber.  It's the possibility of finding something no one else knows about that makes all the work worth while, even if on this given day we didn't locate the caliber of fish we were after.  We still managed to find large numbers of sunfish and crappie, as well as some very nice perch.  This is one of the reasons I love the Alexandria area so much.  There are very few places you can catch hundreds of fish in a day and hope to do better the next.

As for walleye fishing, it continues to be on the slow side for me.  Finding the fish hasn't been an issue, it's getting them to bite on a consistent basis that's been very difficult.  One night you can go out and catch a limit of nice walleye, only to get skunked the very next night.  This is typical with late season walleye.  Generally during this time of the year I try to increase my odds by only fishing in low light time periods.  Right before a storm is also an excellent time to try your luck at some late season walleye.  Walleye closes February 23rd so get out there while you can!

 

January 20th Report

Secrets to Catching Big Daytime Bluegill and Crappie!

 

The ice conditions across the area are excellent.  I’ve been finding anywhere from 18”-24” of ice on average with vehicle traffic nearly everywhere.  The only issue has been the snow and blowing snow.  The bigger lakes such as Osakis, Minnewaska, Miltona and the Chain of Lakes will most likely have plowed roads.  There are also smaller lakes with good plowed roads, but it is more hit and miss.  Snowmobiles are an excellent way to get around and allow you to fish away from other anglers, but if that is not an option you can get to plenty of great fishing areas by vehicle.  There are people plowing new roads everyday so there always seems to be a lot of options. 
 
The fishing across the Alexandria area has been and continues to be downright outstanding.  We’ve been catching quality northern, walleye, bluegill and crappie on a number of lakes.  I’ve also heard good reports from many other lakes I haven’t even had time to fish yet.  I write a lot about catching walleye, so I figured I’d dedicate this article to the finer points of catching big panfish during the day.

Regardless of how well I feel the fishing is I still see and hear of anglers struggling to catch quality sunfish and crappie during the day.  The most common reason I see people struggling is they use what works for them in the low light time periods and expect it to work during the day, such as using heavy equipment and sitting in one spot. When in reality the two time periods require very different techniques and equipment. 
 
In general, quality fish are finicky by nature.  Then, add in the factor of daylight, and these fish become very particular on what they will eat.  Even when they do decide to bite it will usually be a very tentative light bite.  That’s why the common panfish setup people use (a medium action rod with 4-6 pound test line, #6 or #8 hook, wax worm or minnow and a bobber) will most often not work.  These fish can see very well during the day, so that means the bait must move and look as natural as possible for the fish to bite.  I recommend a light but sensitive rod with 2 or 3 lb test line for this type of fishing.  For a hook I’d recommend a small #12 hook.  I prefer a horizontal jig like the #12 Lindy Toad.  For bait I also like to keep things small.  I usually use 1 or 2 Euro larva on my jig at time.  If I use any more than that or a large wax worm I feel I start to push away many of the light biting big bluegill.   
 
The jigging technique is a two part operation.  The first part is the constant jiggle, and the second is the vertical movement.  The majority of people do not realize how fine the jiggle needs to be to make a fish bite.  I actually call it more of a wiggle or vibration than a “jiggle”.  It has to be extremely light.  I almost hold it still at times and let my nerves/heart beat wiggle the tip of the rod.  Now that you have the intensity of the wiggle down, let’s talk about the vertical movement in the water column.  (Note: everything I’m about to explain is based off the use of a fish locator such as Vexilar, Hummingbird, Marcum.  They are all quality units.)  I like to start by dropping my lure down through the fish.  Then, slowly raise the jig (about an 1/8 inch per second) while you wiggle the jig.  It’s important to keep moving the jig up as the fish raises toward your bait.  Fish naturally feed up and the continued upward movement makes the fish feel it’s going to get away so they are more apt to bite it.  Very commonly they do not bite the bait on the first sequence.  There are times I’ve dropped down and jigged up a dozen times to finally get a stubborn giant bluegill to tap my lure.  It’s a bit of a game, and it sure is gratifying when you outsmart something so cautious.

The last part of this puzzle is to stay on fish.  You can do all of the above, but if you don’t move until you find fish it will be for nothing.  I like to start with 15-20 holes in an area I feel will hold fish.  Then I’ll check each hole with my locator.  If there are two or more suspended fish in a hole I’ll quickly drop my lure down.  I’ll fish there as long as I read a good number of fish, but there are many times when I’ll leave a hole with fish to find a hole with even more fish. The more fish you have down a given hole the more competition there is.  This makes the fish think more about missing out on a tasty meal than why they shouldn’t bite your offering.  I see many people get too comfortable and sit on the same couple holes all day catching one here or there.  It's hard for them to move because they're catching fish.  I'm here to tell you it can be so much better than a couple fish.

Grab the family and come explore one of our amazing fisheries!  Good luck, and feel free to email me with any questions you might have.  Good Luck!

 

November 2013 Report:

First Ice Report,  Dec 14th

Ice across the Alexandria area is forming quickly this year with a good layer of ice on most of the lakes.  Currently the ice ranges from 6"-12" thick with the smaller lakes having the thickest ice.  As long as the typical danger spots are avoided the ice is considered very safe right now for anyone wanting to walk out.  I've even started to see people driving vehicles out, of course this is not recommended.  I do like to note this though, because it stresses the fact that the ice is safe for walking and is ready to be fished!

 

Anglers have been doing well on walleye, sunfish and crappie as of late.  There are so many good lake options when it comes to fishing the Alexandria area it can be difficult choosing which one to fish.  There are always lakes that get more attention than others, but keep in mind that some of the best bites are happening on lakes with little to no anglers on them.  Almost all of the lakes in the area have a fishable population of walleye and panfish.

 

The panfish have been very active during both the day and night.  The weedy bays in 10-15fow have been best.  I use a #12 Lindy Toad with a euro Larva and 2-3 pound test line during the day. During the evening I can get away with 4-6 pound line and a Frostee jig with a crappie minnow.

 

I've been having my best luck for walleye right where they were in the fall.  Weed lines near deep water have always treated me well early in the ice season.  My best bait has been a 1/8-3/16oz Perch colored Frostee tipped with a minnow or partial minnow.  Last night I was out and the walleye were just crushing the bait.  They would come in on the locator for only a second and immediately fly up to the bait to hit it.  This is not always the case though.  Many evenings the fish will come in slow and you will have to work the bait up and down a number of times to get the fish to bite.  Even if you do everything right you will generally notice a number of fish that are just not interested.

The fish change their aggressiveness towards baits continuously.  There are numerous reasons they do this, but the most predictable is weather change.  I watch storms just like I do in the summer.  If I see a change in weather coming I'll do my best to be sitting on the ice right before the storm hits.  The fish are much more aggressive during this time period.  In fact, my best days of fishing have been in a light snow prior to the storms arrival.

 

Regardless of the weather, now is one of the best times to be on the ice.  The fish are generally quite active, the ice is predictable and, as long as you don't drive a truck on 6" of ice, it's very safe to be out